Amazing abdomen hand flap

flap

 

Specialists from the Department of Hand Surgery Hospital in Rehovot saved from complete amputation the fingers of a young man. Three fingers of his hand were crushed by machine and presented fourth degree burns. A month after having his fingers sewn into his abdomen to provide ample blood supply, they have been restored, and regained movement almost completely
Go to: http://www.MedicalVideos.us/ for videos of similar surgeries.

How to give injection safely

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Many medications require at-home injections, which require proper training and careful care in order to prevent injuries or infections. Read this article to learn how to properly administer two types of at-home injections: subcutaneous (into the fat beneath the skin) and intramuscular (into the muscle).

Warning: Always follow the instructions given to you by your doctor, and read the instructions that come with your medication if there are any. This article is meant to be helpful, but medication and patient needs may differ from case to case.

 

Steps

Part one: Questions to Consider

  1. Make sure that you are qualified to administer the injection before continuing. Only administer an injection if a doctor has told you that it is safe, and if the medication has been prescribed to the patient.
  2. If you have any questions or doubts regarding how and when to administer the injection, consult your physician or other medical professional before continuing.
  3. Read the directions given to you by your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. If your medication comes with instructions, read those. Remember that the directions given to you by your doctor or other medical professional override whatever directions you may find online or anywhere else.
  4. Determine what type of injection you are giving. There are three common kinds of injections: subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravenous. If you don’t know what kind of injection you are required to administer, consult your physician, pharmacist, or a nurse before continuing.
    • Subcutaneous: Injections made into the fatter layer directly beneath the skin. Examples: insulin for diabetic patients; blood clot medications. 

    • Intramuscular: Injections made directly into the muscle. Examples include vaccines, hormones, and antibiotics. 

    • Intravenous: Injections made to administer fluids directly into the vein. Do not administer an intravenous injection unless you are certified to do so. 

Part Two: Preparation

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly. This will help prevent infections.
  2. Assemble the medication and needle. Make sure that the needle is sterile and unused.
    • Some medications come ready-to-use, while others require you to fill the needle with medication from a vile. In this case, sterilize the top of the vile with alcohol, and remove the needle from its package. Read the instructions on the medication to determine the amount of fluid you will need. Pull the plunger to fill the syringe with air equal to the exact amount of fluid you will need. Holding the vile upside down, insert the needle into it, and push the plunger down, injecting all of the air from the syringe into the vile. Pull the plunger out to withdraw the fluid. 

  3. Note that the needle used for an intramuscular injection is different than the needle used for a subcutaneous injection.
  4. Consider icing the area before administering the injection to reduce pain, particularly if the patient is a child.

Part Three: Administering a Subcutaneous Injection

  1. Determine the injection site based on your doctor’s instructions. You should use a fleshy area like the upper arm.
    • Alternating between sites will help prevent bruising.
  2. Clean the skin on and around the site with rubbing alcohol. Allow the alcohol to properly dry before administering the injection.
  3. Assemble and prepare your medication (see above).
  4. Grasp the area using your free hand.

  5. Insert the needle quickly and carefully at a 45 degree angle.

  6. Let go of the skin with your free hand.
  7. Pull the plunger out slightly to determine whether there is blood in the syringe. If there is blood, then carefully remove the needle and find a different spot to administer the injection. If no blood is found, continue.

  8. Carefully inject the medicine into the patient. Push the plunger down until all of the fluid has been released.
  9. Push down on the skin above the injection site and quickly and carefully remove the needle in the same angle in which it was administered.

Part Four: Administering an Intramuscular Injection

  1. Determine the injection site. Common areas include the buttocks and upper thigh.
    • Alternate between injection sites to prevent bruising and soreness.
  2. Clean the skin on and around the site with rubbing alcohol. Allow the alcohol to properly dry before administering the injection.
  3. Grasp the area using your free hand.

  4. Insert the needle into the skin and through the muscle at a 90 degree angle.

  5. Let go of the skin with your free hand.
  6. Pull the plunger out slightly to determine whether there is blood in the syringe. If there is blood, then carefully remove the needle and find a different spot to administer the injection. If no blood is found, continue.

  7. Carefully inject the medicine into the patient. Push the plunger down until all of the fluid has been released. Do not push too hard; insert slowly to reduce pain.
  8. Remove the needle carefully in the same angle in which it was injected.
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